Council approves temporary wastewater line

Temporary effluent disposal method, parking program among the matters discussed at Jun 8 meeting.

Council is moving forward with a strategy to deal with the challenges it faces in disposing of local wastewater effluent. At its regular June 12 meeting, Council passed a motion to approve a project that entials construction of a temporary wastewater pipeline to the City of Red Deer – subject to final budgetary approval and contract award.

The decision to move forward with the temporary line comes after the provincial government announced its intention to provide $37 million in funding for a wastewater pipeline to Red Deer as a permanent solution to the Town’s wastewater disposal challenges.

During the discussion, one alternative treatment option – the use of packaged wastewater treatment plants – was deemed too costly. It would also require discharge to continue to enter Sylvan Creek. This would potentially not entierly comply with necessary regulations.

Director of Public Works Dave Brand said, in a discussion with Council, that the temporary line has seen approval from all involved stakeholders, including Alberta Transportation, Alberta Environment and Parks, the City of Red Deer and the Sylvan Lake Regional Wastewater Commission.

“There’s a mitigation effect on the environment – this will avoid environmental impacts,” said Brand of the temporary line. “It will send it to the place the regulator tells us to send it – it’s the best place to send it,” said Brand.

Brand and Council also discussed the possibility of diverting some of the treated effluent to local agricultural lands for irrigation, reducing the overall volumne of effluent to be transported to Red Deer.

The temporary line is an alternative to disposing effluent by discharging it twice yearly into Sylvan Creek and Cygnet Lake.

Pay Parking Update

Council tied up some loose ends relating to its Visitor Pay Parking Program, by instructing administration to amend the Paid Parking downtown zone to be free parking for all local residents who are registered with the program.

After a discussion about what sort of fee would be appropriate for non-residents [including County and summer village residents] Council decided to set the price for non-resident season passes to $126.50 per year.

Council also directed administration to conduct a review of the Visitor Pay Parking Program after its first year of implementation – any proposed changes will be presented and costed in the preparation and deliberation of the 2018 budget.

Street Name Proposals

Council approved several potential names for streets in the Iron Gate subdivision which were provided by the Archive Society. Names for streets approved by Council include Ilaison, Inglis, Ingraham, Innes and Iverson. The chosen names were a portion of a larger list provided by the Archive Society, along with a series of rationales for the suggested street names.

The names Council approved were deemed to be appropriate and locally significant. Council requested that administration provide more information on the significance of the rest of the suggested street names, and a report on what processes are necessary when naming new streets.

Coun. Megan Hanson emphasized the need for meaningful street names, and said she felt some concern with some the suggestions, also saying “we don’t know who some of these people are. We don’t want to name a street after a person with an unsavoury history.”

Payne also weighed in on the issue saying “when you read through these, some people are exceptional – people who have contributed to Sylvan Lake. There are some we know [on the list], but having an active golf membership is not a reason to have a street named after you.”

Old Hotel

The timeline for the development of the site of the old Sylvan Lake Hotel has been extended by two years. Development of the site is now required to commence on or before Nov. 15 2018 – development has to be completed by Nov. 15, 2019.

It was disclosed to Council that work on the site has passed its previous development deadlines, and remains incomplete due to the downturn in the economy. Council made its decision to extend the settlement agreement on the recommendation of administration.

Off-site Levies

Council defeated a motion to pass third reading of Bylaw 1740. Council decided to withhold third reading on the bylaw which relates to off-site levies and how they are calculated.

The passing of the bylaw was delayed because Council decided more time is required to consult with – answer the questions of – a number of land developers who have expressed concern about the bylaw, and its effects on them.

Lit Signs

Council approved the permit for four illuminated fascia signs, through a relaxation of the town’s land use bylaw, at 110 5003 Lakeshore Drive, for a local business in the Waterfront Control District of Sylvan Lake.

Council was told the proposed signs would add character to the development without adverse glare, and that administration was supportive of the particular proposed sign design.

In response to concerns from Coun. Dale Plante regarding the design of the signs and any potential violation of regulations for signs in the waterfront control district that may ensue in the future, Coun. Jas Payne said the signs “aren’t big and ugly. LED lit signs are quite beautiful.”

“I went down to see what this looked like when they turned it on, and it is very nice – very classy,” added Payne. “It doesn’t brighten anything beyond the sign; it doesn’t illuminate the ground or light up the area it’s in.”