Photo Courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service Flickr Photostream/PublicDomainFiles.com

Photo Courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service Flickr Photostream/PublicDomainFiles.com

Sylvan Lakers howling to support essential workers

The Sylvan Lake Howl also serves as a way to release pent-up energy and connect the community

The Town has asked Sylvan Lakers to join the wolfpack in support of all essential workers and community spirit.

The Sylvan Lake Howl asks residents to look at the clock at 7 p.m. on Saturdays and open a window or step outside to let out a howl.

Jared Waldo, culture and tourism supervisor for the Town of Sylvan Lake, says the idea for a howl came from a member of Town staff who had a similar experience while studying abroad in Sweden.

“She was explaining that her student dorm would howl every week as a way to kind of keep connected and present with each other,” explained Waldo in a phone interview.

“For us, it was just something to try and do, kind of see how we could get people involved.”

Waldo said the weekly howl is for everyone, whether 65 years old or six-years-old or anywhere in between.

The weekly rally helps serve a few different purposes, starting with supporting those who provide essential services such as health care workers, truck drivers and grocery store employees.

“It’s an opportunity for us to signal to them that we care about you, we appreciate you more than you know and if you can hear us from any part of town that is our way of connected to you and saying thank you,” said Waldo, adding another aspect of the howl is just that, connecting.

Hearing the howls from all over town helps the community feel connected, realize they are not alone and all in this together.

“If I can hear you from my house in Meadowview Close and I’m up in Pierview and you can hear us down on 44 Street that’s allowing us to connect in some small way,” commented Waldo.

Lastly, the howl can serve as an outlet to release pent-up frustration and energy.

Waldo says the Town thought Saturday nights were a good time to step out, have fun and let it all loose.

Participants are asked to step out and make some noise however they choose, whether it be a howl, a scream or a cheer.

The first Sylvan Lake Howl was last weekend, March 28, and will continue weekly with no set timeline.

“Sylvan Lake is such a tight-knit community and we love doing things together, it’s something we can do together,” said Waldo.

Anyone who is participating in the howl is welcome to turn the camera on themselves, family or loved ones to record the experience. Videos can be shared using the hashtag #SylvanLakeHowl.

The Sylvan Lake Lighthouse is being illuminated in blue each night as a symbol of support for health care workers.

Coronavirus

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