White honoured for involvement in community suppers, gardens

A community supper held at Sylvan Lake Alliance Community Church last Tuesday night provided a fitting tribute

Mayor Sean McIntyre

Mayor Sean McIntyre

A community supper held at Sylvan Lake Alliance Community Church last Tuesday night provided a fitting tribute to former Growing Green Neighbours head cook Lorna White.

The supper, presented by Growing Green Neighbours, was held in White’s honour, in recognition of her contribution to community suppers, and for bringing Growing Food Security in Alberta (GFSA) knowledge and awareness to Sylvan Lake.

Although White was unable to attend the supper, friend Patci Hopkins spoke on her behalf.

“There were community dinners here that brought people together, and at one point I think there were over 100 people who would come to these events,” she said. “It was an awesome way to connect with your neighbours and new people. It was fellowship, and Lorna was so very good at bringing everyone to the table.”

Mayor Sean McIntyre, on behalf of the Town of Sylvan Lake, presented a painting by Sylvan Lake artist Diane Dahl, which was accepted by Hopkins on White’s behalf.

“We want to show our appreciation for every effort in community building, and recognizing people like Lorna is a great step in that direction,” McIntyre said. “We wouldn’t be where we are without the people that are building those foundations and contributing to our community.”

Organizer Giselle Campbell said about 100 meals were served at the supper, which was provided at no cost for those who attended. Donations were accepted at the door to cover the cost of groceries and other expenses.

“We had a wonderful crowd, and it was just exactly what we wanted for Lorna,” said Campbell. “It was a great night.”

She added that help at the supper was received from all corners of the community, and came from individual volunteers, Sylvan Lake Collective Kitchen, and École H. J. Cody High School’s Interact Club.

Sylvan Lake residents and businesses donated food for the supper, and people unacquainted with White even offered their support.

“They just wanted to be there and support someone who has been that active in the community,” said Campbell.

Space at the church was used for the supper at no cost.

“Everybody was just chipping in,” said Campbell. “You couldn’t ask for better community-minded people.”

Growing Green Neighbours was started in 2007 as a way of educating people about food security through community suppers and community gardens.