Wolf expert educates students on changing hunting laws

Wolf expert educates students on changing hunting laws

Wolf Awareness field researcher Sadie Parr discusses wolf protection with students of Ecole Mother Teresa School March 26.

Wolf Awareness field researcher Sadie Parr discusses wolf protection with students of Ecole Mother Teresa School March 26.

Grade 7 students at École Mother Teresa School learned just how endangered wolves are in Canada during a presentation by Wolf Awareness field researcher Sadie Parr March 26.

Students were presented with the facts of how wolves behave, live, what they eat and their role in nature. They also learned that humans are the biggest threat to wolves, and Parr said they are not being protected in Canada.

She said wolves have the same rights as rats when it comes to hunting regulations, and that there is a common misconception that wolves are aggressive towards humans, when in fact, their behaviour is quite the opposite.

“Wolves are very shy by nature, but in many areas they have learned to fear humans because we have been persecuting them for so long,” Parr said. “They are also curious and intelligent animals, so where they haven’t learned to fear humans, they are more likely to be seen.”

Parr said it’s important to educate students on the subject as they are “future leaders.” It’s very important, she feels, that they understand how various aspects of nature are all interconnected.

“I believe it’s very important for young people to recognize the inherent value of all living animals,” Parr said. “Wolves are extremely intelligent and are very important to the environment. This is all information that is going to contribute to a natural legacy in Canada if we manage things responsibly.”

Parr said she hopes the students will learn that their voice does count, and she reinforced the idea of making a difference by advocating for the fair treatment of wolves. She said writing to decision makers, signing petitions, educating people on the truth about wolves and asking to improve hunting regulations are all ways youths can help make change happen.

“If they don’t want to see wolves and wildlife mismanaged in their province, they can affect change,” Parr said.