The Lounge in Bacchus at the Wedgewood Hotel and Spa.

In the Lap of Luxury at two Relais & Chateaux Hotels

Spending time at Vancouver’s Wedgewood Hotel and Tofino’s Wickaninnish Inn

  • Oct. 10, 2018 3:15 p.m.

– Story by Susan Lundy

Story courtesy of Boulevard Magazine, a Black Press Media publication

Like Boulevard Magazine on Facebook and follow them on Instagram

Charles McDiarmid loves to tell a good story, and he’s relishing this one.

As the managing director and co-owner of the Wickaninnish Inn, he is recalling his quest back in the ‘80s to build a prestigious Relais & Châteaux hotel on an outcropping of rocks owned by his family in Tofino.

He tells the story with the same exuberance and charm exhibited while showing me around me around his beautifully appointed inn — an exquisite destination hotel and restaurant on the edge of Vancouver Island’s wild west coast.

In British Columbia we are blessed to have five Relais & Châteaux properties, and I set out this summer to experience two of them. And while the Wickaninnish and the Wedgewood may seem polar opposite in experience — one built in remote Tofino and the other sumptuously revealed in a grand downtown Vancouver building — they meet in their expression of the Relais & Châteaux’s “five Cs” of charm, courtesy, character, cuisine and calm.

Founded in France in 1954, Relais & Châteaux represents the highest benchmark in hotel accommodations and fine dining, and includes a worldwide group of more than 540 privately owned hotels and restaurants. Each must pass an anonymous review process every two years in order to maintain the designation. The concept grew from the vacationing traditions of upper-class French society, who travelled to a variety of “relais” (lodges) and “châteaux” (castles) which, while different in architecture, scenery and cuisine, presented consistently high standards.

Years ago, when Charles was learning the ins and outs of the hotel industry working at the Four Seasons, most hotels were structured to serve the business traveller. However, over the years Charles heard a consistent theme: visiting businessmen would say, “When my wife and I want to get away, we go to a Relais & Châteaux.”

Charles began exploring these boutique hotels, noting they were all small, family-owned and highly regarded.

“That became my goal,” says Charles, whose family dreamed of constructing a hotel on their land that hugs Tofino’s Chesterman Beach. “In my mind, that’s what we wanted to be… that was the pinnacle.”

The goal to build a Relais & Châteaux hotel in Tofino began to take shape, but before Charles could set planning in motion, he wanted design standards for the prestigious association.

“I wondered things like — do we need to install a bidet in every bathroom?”

So he started making phone calls, and over the next two years, tried to obtain a set of Relais & Châteaux standards by calling myriad people in cities all over the world, leaving messages, sometimes phoning in the middle of the night to accommodate differing time zones. Charles finally got his answer from a heavily-accented woman in France … and he laughed for two days afterwards.

“How do you become a Relais & Châteaux hotel?” he asked.

“Well, monsieur — either you are or you’re not.”

Today the standards for Relais & Châteaux are a little more exacting, says Charles, adding, “I’ve gone out and looked at others and discovered each is eclectic … Each property is its own unique experience.”

He says: “It strikes a chord these days. Travellers want to feel that a place respects its location. It’s an experience of the destination — not an imposing of it.”

Charles, who wanted to “dance on the table” when the Wickaninnish received its designation soon after opening 1996, adds, “To me it is the pinnacle of my dream to be welcomed into the family of Relais & Châteaux.”

Wickaninnish In interior

As I stood at the window of my room at the Wickaninnish, looking out over the length of sand and pounding surf that is Chesterman Beach, I thought, “Speaking of pinnacles — this is my dream vacation.” True to its honouring of the “destination,” the Wickaninnish is a celebration of West Coast art and culture. Every single detail — from the exquisite yellow cedar table in the brand new wine cellar and tasting room to the remote-controlled curtain above the bathtub in my room — speaks to extraordinary thoughtfulness and sumptuous luxury.

Cuisine at The Pointe Restaurant is nothing short of miraculous, with the same care and attention to detail going into every dish, served in a spectacular, ocean-edged, art-infused room with floor-to-ceiling windows. This is the wild West Coast at its very finest.

In a seemingly different experience, the Wedgewood unfolds as a luxurious oasis in the heart of downtown Vancouver. Greeted at the entrance by sharply dressed valets, visitors step off of Hornby Street and enter a lavish-yet-cosy, chandelier-lit lobby that oozes with rich colours and provides a stark contrast between inside and out.

Everything from the golden-hued antiques and stately furniture to the artwork on the walls in our expansive king suite and the fine china (Wedgewood Fine Bone China!) in the stunning Bacchus restaurant gently evokes a sense of “grand English manor.”

Wedgewood Vancouver entrance

The Wedgewood Hotel & Spa has been a member of Relais & Châteaux since 2008, and general manager Glenn Eleiter says the designation “ensures our clients will experience something wonderful when they walk through our doors. It is confidence-inspiring for guests and staff alike.”

Indeed, as my husband and I sat on the private balcony of our suite, sipping glasses of rosé and enjoying the sights and soothing sounds of a park and water feature below, the experience is definitely wonderful. While the Wedgewood easily expresses all of the Relais & Châteaux five Cs, we were almost speechless at the level of service (courtesy) provided by the staff. Every need was met, often before we knew we needed it.

Glenn concurs. Of the five Cs, he says, “They are all important and it is difficult to place one ahead of another, but we receive accolades from our clients for our warm, authentic welcome and the attentiveness that we provide at every encounter, so ‘courtesy’ is one of our strengths.”

He adds, “But, I [also have to mention] the cuisine in Bacchus that our Executive Chef Montgomery Lau prepares with his culinary team … we are a culinary-forward hotel with Bacchus being at the very heart of the property.”

Our two meals at Bacchus — dinner and breakfast — were simply spectacular.

The restaurant/lounge at Bacchus is rich and romantic with antique furniture, warm, dark cherry wood and Murano crystal fixtures. A large painting of Bacchus, the Greek god of wine and revelry, presides over the lounge.

The night we dined there, the large, street-facing windows were open to the warm night air and a pianist gently set a backdrop of familiar tunes. We supped on a range of delicately presented seafood, sampling poached steelhead salmon, halibut, pan-roasted scallops and lobster linguine, and sipped sparkling rosé and later a Châteaux La Gorce from the restaurant’s superb Bordeaux selection.

And like the Wickaninnish, the Wedgewood is family owned and operated, with the daughter of founder Eleni Skalbania — Elpie Marinakis Jackson — currently the co-owner and managing director.

Eleni Skalbania founded the Wedgewood in 1984, when she purchased and re-worked an old apartment hotel, transforming it into its current glory.

“We strike the perfect balance between world-class amenities and product with sincere and caring people providing personal service at the highest of levels,” says Glenn.

Indeed, my experience sampling just two of BC’s Relais & Châteaux hotels has me fired up to check out the others.

Boulevard MagazinehotelInnRelais & ChateauxtravelVacationVancouvervancouverislandWedgewood HotelWickaninnish

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta has 3,651 active cases of COVID-19. (File photo)
432 new COVID cases sets another record Friday

Central zone holds steady at 126 active cases

"We are looking seriously at the spread and determining what our next steps should be," says Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, as the daily number of COVID-19 cases continues to climb.
427 new COVID cases is highest in Alberta ever

Central zone has 126 active cases of COVID-19

100 Women Who Care make a donation to Sylvan Lake Food Bank and Bethany Care Centre. Photo By Megan Roth/Sylvan Lake News
100 Women Who Care donate to four Sylvan Lake groups

The Food Bank, Bethany Sylvan Lake, Community Partners and the Library all received a donation

RCMP. (Black Press File Photo)
Calgary man dies in two-vehicle collision near Sylvan Lake

A semi truck collided with a SUV just east of Hwy. 781 on Hwy 11.

Shaelynn Decock and her dog Taco, who has been missing since Aug. 26. Photo Submitted
Sylvan Lake woman looking for closure for her stolen dog

Shaelynn Decock says it has been two months since she last saw her dog Taco

B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson, B.C. NDP leader John Horgan and B.C. Greens leader Sonia Furstenau. (Black Press Media)
VIDEO: One day until B.C. voters go to the polls in snap election defined by pandemic

NDP Leader John Horgan’s decision to call an election comes more than a year ahead of schedule and during a pandemic

Comedic actor Seth Rogen, right, and business partner Evan Goldberg pose in this undated handout photo. When actor Seth Rogen was growing up and smoking cannabis in Vancouver, he recalls there was a constant cloud of shame around the substance that still lingers. Rogen is determined to change that. (Maarten de Boer ohoto)
Seth Rogen talks about fighting cannabis stigma, why pot should be as accepted as beer

‘I smoke weed all day and every day and have for 20 years’

Leader of the Opposition Erin O’Toole rises during Question Period in the House of Commons Thursday October 22, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
O’Toole tells Alberta UCP AGM Liberals were ‘late and confused’ on COVID response

He says Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has taken charge and not waited to make things happen

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney arrives for an announcement at a news conference in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol
Inquiry into oil and gas foes to deliver report next year: Kenney

A lawsuit filed by environmental law firm Ecojustice argues the inquiry is politically motivated

The Canadian border is pictured at the Peace Arch Canada/USA border crossing in Surrey, B.C. Friday, March 20, 2020. More than 4.6 million people have arrived in Canada since the border closed last March and fewer than one-quarter of them were ordered to quarantine while the rest were deemed “essential” and exempted from quarantining. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Majority of international travellers since March deemed ‘essential’, avoid quarantine

As of Oct. 20, 3.5 million travellers had been deemed essential, and another 1.1 million were considered non-essential

This photo provided by Air Force Reserve shows a sky view of Hurricane Epsilon taken by Air Force Reserve hurricane hunter team over the Atlantic Ocean taken Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020.   Epsilon’s maximum sustained winds have dropped slightly as it prepares to sideswipe Bermuda on a path over the Atlantic Ocean.  The National Hurricane Center says it should come close enough Thursday, Oct. 22, evening to merit a tropical storm warning for the island.  (Air Force Reserve via AP)
Hurricane Epsilon expected to remain offshore but will push waves at Atlantic Canada

Epsilon is not expected to have any real impact on land

A voter places her absentee ballot in the ballot box, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, at Merrill Auditorium in Portland, Maine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Robert F. Bukaty
American voters living in Canada increasingly being counted in presidential race

The largest number of Canadian-based American voters cast their ballots in New York and California

A composite image of three photographs shows BC NDP Leader John Horgan, left, in Coquitlam, B.C., on Sept. 25, 2020; BC Green Party Leader Sonia Furstenau, centre, in Victoria on Sept. 24, 2020; and BC Liberal Party Leader Andrew Wilkinson Pitt Meadows, B.C., on Sept. 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck, Chad Hipolito
British Columbia votes in snap election called during COVID-19 pandemic

NDP Leader John Horgan called the snap election one year before the fixed voting date

Nunavut's provincial flag flies on a flag pole in Ottawa, on Tuesday June 30, 2020. The annual report from Nunavut's representative for children and youth says "complacency and a lack of accountability" in the territory's public service means basic information about young people needing services isn’t tracked. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Nunavut’s young people ‘should be expecting more’ from government services: advocate

‘The majority of information we requested is not tracked or was not provided by departments’

Most Read