file photo

Details on revamped draft K-6 school curriculumn were unveiled March 29th

Four key learning themes include literacy, numeracy, citizenship and practical skills

After more than a year of consultations with parents and teachers, details on revamped Alberta K-6 school curriculum – still in the draft stages – were unveiled March 29th.

Adriana LaGrange, minister of education, said that curriculum is based on, “Proven research and is designed to improve student outcomes across all subjects, following several years of declining and stagnant student performance.

“I really believe in my heart that this new curriculum will position our children for great success and give them the best chance to reach their potential,” she said. “In the last election, we heard loud and clear from parents that it was time for a renewed focus on special knowledge and skills in the K to 6 curriculum,” she added.

“Albertans will have many, many months to have their say – as will teachers. Some classrooms will begin piloting the new curriculum on a voluntary basis this September. We will hear what teachers think while they are actually teaching it.”

LaGrange explained that parents and teachers will see four key learning themes surfacing throughout the curriculum: literacy, numeracy, citizenship and practical skills.

Under literacy, students will be taught to master reading, writing, speaking and listening via using phonics and “other proven best practices.”

And under the citizenship theme, students will draw from history, geography, economics, civics, and other studies to, “Develop an appreciation of how Canadians have built one of the most generous, prosperous, and diverse societies in the world.”

Practical skills runs the gamut from learning about household budgeting, digital literacy and business planning to healthy relationships and the importance of consent, she said.

Some educational experts and community leaders have already offered their views of the curriculum changes to date.

“The new K-6 curriculum is inspired by the science of reading and brings to our teachers, parents, and children what is currently known around the world as best practice to support our children to become successful readers and writers,” noted George Georgiou, professor, faculty of education – educational psychology, University of Alberta.

“I am thrilled that the Alberta government has ensured that consent will be taught as an essential part of the K-6 curriculum,” added Sheldon Kennedy, co-founder, Respect Group.

“I have been advocating for these changes for many years and applaud this leadership,” he said.

“We clearly know that this topic thrives on society’s ignorance and indifference so the sooner we give our young people the tools and confidence, the better. To prevent maltreatment we need to start at the youngest age possible, so, in my mind, this education will not only change lives, it will save them.”

Looking ahead, LaGrange said that the the Province will hold to a transparent review process.

“I want to remind everyone that this is a draft curriculum that is looking to be piloted this September. It will not become finalized until 2022 and there is an opportunity for all Albertans to have a say in what they see.”

To that end, the draft K-6 curriculum is online at alberta.ca/curriculum for all Albertans to provide feedback until the spring 2022, she added.

Students are expected to be learning from the new curriculum during the 2022-23 school year.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

There were six additional deaths across Alberta reported over the past 24 hours, bringing the death toll to 1,926 since the beginning of the pandemic. (File photo)
Sylvan Lake Municipal Library. (File Photo)
Sylvan Lake Municipal Library provides solution for youth seeking volunteer hours

Youth can fulfill their volunteer hour requirements by reviewing books

Dr. Wayne John Edwards, 66, died Tuesday at Chinook Regional Hospital. (Cornerstone Funeral Home)
Lethbridge doctor becomes 7th Alberta health-care worker to die from COVID-19

Dr. Wayne John Edwards, who was 66, died Tuesday at the Chinook Regional Hospital in the southern Alberta city

(File photo)
Boil water advisory continues in Sylvan Lake

AHS has made the boil water advisory mandetory, crews are still working ot fix the water main break

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh, followed by the Prince of Wales, left and Princess Anne, right, into St George’s Chapel for his funeral, at Windsor Castle, in Windsor, England, Saturday April 17, 2021. (Danny Lawson/Pool via AP)
Trudeau announces $200K donation to Duke of Edinburgh award as Prince Philip laid to rest

A tribute to the late prince’s ‘remarkable life and his selfless service,’ the Prime Minister said Saturday

A vial of some of the first 500,000 AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine doses that Canada secured. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Carlos Osorio
Canada’s 2nd blood clot confirmed in Alberta after AstraZeneca vaccine

The male patient, who is in his 60s, is said to be recovering

The funeral of Britain’s Prince Philip in Windsor, England, on Saturday, April 17, 2021. Philip died April 9 at the age of 99. (Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP)
PHOTOS: Prince Philip laid to rest Saturday as sombre queen sits alone

The entire royal procession and funeral took place out of public view within the grounds of Windsor Castle

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on as Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland responds to a question during a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Expectations high as Trudeau Liberals get ready to unveil first pandemic budget

The Liberals will look to thread an economic needle with Monday’s budget

Doses of the Moderna COVID‑19 vaccine in a freezer trailer, to be transported to Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Pfizer to increase vaccine deliveries in Canada as Moderna supply slashed

Moderna plans to ship 650,000 doses of its vaccine to Canada by the end of the month, instead of the expected 1.2 million

A empty classroom is pictured at Eric Hamber Secondary school in Vancouver, B.C. Monday, March 23, 2020. The Alberta government says schools in Calgary will move to at-home learning starting Monday for students in grades 7 to 12.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Calgary schools to shift to at-home learning for grades 7 to 12 due to COVID-19

The change, due to COVID-19, is to last for two weeks

A man wears a protective face covering to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as he walks past the emergency entrance of Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
COVID-19 spike in B.C. could overwhelm B.C. hospitals: modelling group

There are 397 people are in hospital due to the virus, surpassing a previous high of 374 seen in December

Most Read