The RCMP said officers responded to a complaint about an “unwanted man” in a home near the community at 7:40 p.m. local time on Friday. The Indigenous man shot and killed. CP photo

The RCMP said officers responded to a complaint about an “unwanted man” in a home near the community at 7:40 p.m. local time on Friday. The Indigenous man shot and killed. CP photo

Indigenous man fatally shot by RCMP was troubled but not violent, says chief

“He had his demons but he was always very friendly, he never tried to harm anybody”

MIRAMICHI, N.B. — The chief of a New Brunswick First Nation says an Indigenous man shot and killed by the RCMP was troubled, but not a violent person.

Chief Bill Ward of the Metepenagiag Mi’kmaq Nation said Rodney Levi shouldn’t have become the province’s second victim of a fatal police shooting in less than a month on Friday.

“He had his demons but he was always very friendly, he never tried to harm anybody,” Ward said during an emotional Facebook event on Saturday.

Ward says Levi visited his home Friday and talked about wanting to move to Fort McMurray, Alta., for a fresh start.

He said Levi was a slight man who tried to get a mental health assessment at hospital recently, but was refused. Ward said Levi had trouble sleeping in the days before the incident.

“He’s not a violent man. He might have poached some salmon but that’s it,” Ward said from the community about 30 kilometres west of Miramichi.

The RCMP were called to a home after Levi attended a barbecue, where he had planned to seek guidance from a church minister.

Ward said police told him that Levi had two knives in his sweater and threatened officers.

“He wasn’t in the right state of mind at that point of time. He wasn’t a violent person, so basically to me what it says is that if you’re mentally ill and you have a bad day, the cops can kill you for it,” said Ward.

“I just want to preserve his memory and not let people twist the story to justify what they did,” he said, taking several breaks to regain his composure. “He wasn’t some monster that they’re going to try to paint him to be.”

Ward said community members were going to remember Levi by lighting a sacred fire and holding an ceremony.

The RCMP said officers responded to a complaint about an “unwanted man” in a home near the community at 7:40 p.m. local time on Friday.

“When police arrived, they were confronted by a man who was carrying knives,” said RCMP Cpl. Jullie Rogers-Marsh.

She said officers used a stun gun several times but were unable to subdue the man.

An officer then discharged a firearm. The suspect was declared dead in hospital around 9 p.m.

On June 4, Chantel Moore, 26, died after being shot by an Edmundston Police Department officer. Moore, from a First Nation in British Columbia, had moved to the community in northwestern New Brunswick to be near her mother and six-year-old daughter.

Police have said an officer performing a wellness check allegedly encountered a woman with a knife.

“It’s an international disaster when you talk about racism,” Roger Augustine, the regional chief representing New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, said in an interview.

“Racism is everywhere. It’s like a virus, like COVID-19. That’s how I see racism. It just seeps through the communities and kills the young people, and the old people.”

Quebec’s independent police investigation agency, the Bureau des enquetes independantes, is investigating both shootings. New Brunswick does not have a similar agency, which is why the Quebec organization is involved.

On Saturday, the bureau explained in an unsigned statement that it had accepted a request by New Brunswick authorities to determine the circumstances surrounding the death of a 48-year-old man during an RCMP intervention.

The watchdog said it is responsible for informing for keeping in touch with family and while the information is confidential to the bureau, the family representative can choose to share it as they see fit.

The Quebec organization said it will submit a report to the coroner overseeing the probe and the New Brunswick Public Prosecution Service to determine whether charges will be laid.

Levi’s death prompted scores of emotional reactions from members of the community.

“My bro Rodney Levi, my childhood friend … Got tears in my eyes thinking how this happened,” wrote Dwayne Everett Ward.

“Shot twice by the police … I pray for all your family, I know they’re hurting right now … I’m overwhelmed with sadness about all this.”

There have been calls for a broader inquiry to examine systemic bias against Indigenous people in the province’s policing and criminal justice systems.

Jeremy Dutcher, a New Brunswick-born, classically-trained Indigenous tenor and composer, called out the province’s premier on social media, saying he wants to see discussions on issues like police defunding and better social programs .

“I’m really encouraging our leadership in this country to sit down and listen to Indigenous people,” Dutcher said. “If the Truth and Reconciliation Commission didn’t wake people up … I hope events like this are starting to make things very clear that we have a real problem in this country.”

For Dutcher, those discussions should also include body cameras for police officers.

“When we don’t witness, we only have one side of the story,” Dutcher said. “Rodney, Chantel, they don’t have the chance to tell their side of the story, there’s no justice there.”

Jake Stewart, New Brunswick’s minister of Aboriginal affairs, has said he supports the call, saying the province has a problem with systemic racism toward Indigenous people.

On Friday, the commissioner of the RCMP, Brenda Lucki, issued a statement saying it is her responsibility to ensure the RCMP is free of racism, discrimination and bias.

She also said she struggled with the concept of systemic racism when asked about the issue.

“I did acknowledge that we, like others, have racism in our organization, but I did not say definitively that systemic racism exists in the RCMP,” she said. “I should have.”

“As many have said, I do know that systemic racism is part of every institution, the RCMP included. Throughout our history and today, we have not always treated racialized and Indigenous people fairly.”

Augustine said “systemic racism is not owned by the RCMP.”

“And it’s not owned by any government in any country. Systemic racism is something that has to be addressed by the community itself, and in this case it’s New Brunswick. Racism exists in all peoples. Racism is about judging people. When (you) walk down the streets and you see someone you don’t like, you judge their clothing, the colour of their skin …. that’s racism.”

The six chiefs in the Wolastoqey First Nation in New Brunswick also issued a statement on Levi’s death.

“As we have said all week, we are not experiencing isolated incidents, this is just further proof that systemic discrimination is pervasive in this province,” they wrote. “We need action now, we cannot afford another tragic loss of life.”

Meanwhile, marches were organized in several communities in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia to pay tribute to Moore on Saturday.

The events were followed by ”healing walks” in Edmundston, Fredericton and Moncton, N.B., as well as Halifax and Membertou, N.S.

In Halifax, more than 500 people — many of them wearing masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19 — gathered at Halifax City Hall to listen to speeches and Indigenous music before marching through the sun-drenched downtown to the Halifax Regional Police headquarters.

A few protesters carried a banner that read: “Abolish the police.”

Organizer Raven Davis told the crowd that Moore’s young daughter will grow up mourning her mother every time she sees a police car.

“Chantel’s little girl is going to bed tonight without a hug from her loving arms,” Davis said. “Most importantly, she will never have he opportunity to know her mother’s resilience, strength and beauty.”

A private funeral service was held for Moore in Edmundston on Thursday, where she was remembered as a kind soul who united family from both sides of the country.

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