Town residents encouraged to participate in Rain Barrel Rebate Program

The town is now accepting applications for its new Rain Barrel Rebate Program.

The town is now accepting applications for its new Rain Barrel Rebate Program, which is meant to encourage residents to support the idea of conserving water.

The program offers residents a rebate of 50 per cent of the rain barrel cost up to $50 per barrel and a maximum of $100 total will be applied to a resident’s utility account, reads the application.

The rebate program is offered on a first-come, first- served basis, said Town of Sylvan Lake communications officer Joanne Gaudet. She said that if residents are interested in benefiting from the rebate program, all they have to do is buy a barrel from a local business, keep the receipt and fill out the rebate application form available at either the town’s public works facility or on online at sylvanlake.ca/programming/go-green.

“You set the rain barrel up underneath an eavestrough and it collects the rain water,” Gaudet said. “Rain water is better for your plants and better for your soil. It minimizes the amount of municipal water that you’re using so you cut down on your water bill.

”Gaudet said conserving water is important in Sylvan Lake, and said if residents conserve water at home it will affect their utility bill directly. She said residents can used non-chlorinated rain water filled with oxygen to water their garden.

“It’s better to keep your plants happy and healthy,” Gaudet said. “It’s not drinking water, but for your garden it’s a great option.

”Gaudet said there is a high hope that the community will take a strong interest in going green with this rebate program. She said that using rain water to water soil, plants and flowers allows for municipal town water to be conserved for drinking, daily home use and emergency use.

“The town has always been very committed to conservation and environmental initiatives, and this is one of those initiatives,” Gaudet said. “It’s simple and not overwhelming for the public to get involved with. It makes a difference.”