Trudeau offers $14B to provinces for anti-COVID-19 efforts through rest of year

Trudeau offers $14B to provinces for anti-COVID-19 efforts through rest of year

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Friday he has offered provinces and territories up to $14 billion in new federal transfers if they work with Ottawa on a “safe-restart agreement” that will help Canadians return to more normal living without a massive surge in new COVID-19 cases.

Trudeau said the “substantial offer,” which he made during his weekly conference call with premiers Thursday evening, will include money to cover 10 days of paid sick leave for workers. It will also include protective gear for front-line health workers and businesses who need help keeping their employees safe, money for child care facilities to be able to reopen safely and for municipal governments to help keep city services like transit running.

He did not specifically mention long-term care centres, which have borne the brunt of COVID-19 deaths in Canada, but said funds for protecting vulnerable seniors would be in the mix.

He said resuming economic activity requires the right resources so all Canadians have access to the same protections.

“Canadians have sacrificed too much over the past couple of months to lose the progress we’ve made,” Trudeau said.

More than 94,000 Canadians have now been confirmed to have COVID-19, but the spread of the novel coronavirus has slowed substantially in recent days, and the vast majority of new cases are being found in and around Montreal and Toronto.

All provinces have lifted some of the restrictions on public activities and gatherings but to varying degrees. The federal jobs report Friday showed nearly 290,000 jobs were added to the economy in May, a sign the federal government said is hopeful, though far from what is needed. Trudeau said governments have to keep their eyes squarely on getting more people back to work.

Trudeau said the $14 billion is intended to roll out over the next six to eight months, but the fine print has to be negotiated with the provinces. He has not yet specified how the money will be divided, other than to say it will be targeted to getting specific results. In other words, provinces will need to show how they plan to spend the money before they get anything.

That was an immediate no-go zone for Quebec Premier Francois Legault, who said Quebec should get the most money because it has had the most COVID-19 cases and that the funds should flow without any strings attached.

“If he really wants to help us in the (long-term care homes), he could transfer us money, but it has to be without conditions,” Legault told reporters during a news briefing in Orford in Quebec’s Eastern Townships region.

“I was very, very clear that yes, we want our share of the $14 billion, but we don’t want any conditions.”

The money would increase federal transfers to the provinces by 17 per cent this year. Ontario Premier Doug Ford said it is a good start but he was looking for $23 billion for his province alone.

“Fourteen billion dollars for all of Canada just won’t cut it,” he said.

Toronto Mayor John Tory said he was pleased to see an acknowledgment from Ottawa that cities need help but appeared frustrated at the lack of detail on what his city might actually get out of the deal. He said if the provinces and Ottawa fail to come up with real help, a city like his will be forced to massively hike taxes or massively cut services, both of which he said are unacceptable options that will hurt people.

Municipal governments have faced drastic declines in revenue as money-making services like sports and recreation programs were forced to stop.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Small force of locals team up for Sylvan Lake Underwater Cleanup

The annual cleanup was focused on getting an much garbage out of the lake as possible

Central zone active cases down to 20

Province provides update

Gord Bamford serenades Sylvan Lake at sold out concert

Gord Bamford played for a sold out crowd at a drive-in concert Sept. 19 in Sylvan Lake

Snake Lake Brewing takes home gold in the Canadian Brewing Awards

Central Alberta breweries Hawk Tail Brewery and Blindman Brewing also brought home top accolades

Central Alberta rancher-turned-writer brings life experiences into fiction

J.L. Cole explores the complexities of relationships in debut novel Silver Heights

Quirky Canadian comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek’ takes Emmys by storm with comedy sweep

Toronto-raised Daniel Levy and Ottawa-born Annie Murphy both got supporting actor nods

Majority of Canadians support wearing masks during COVID-19, oppose protests: poll

Nearly 90 per cent felt wearing a mask was a civic duty because it protects others from COVID-19

RCMP say body located of man who fell in river during stop for photos in Banff

Parks Canada has said the man was from India and living in Canada on a work visa

Paper towel in short supply as people stay home, clean more, industry leader says

While toilet paper consumption has returned to normal levels, paper towel sales continue to outpace pre-COVID levels

Lacombe beekeepers give the buzz on winterizing hives

Winterizing a honeybee hive is not a simple task, local apiarists say

Six injured, man in custody following BB gun incident in Alberta, RCMP say

Airdrie’s downtown core was told to shelter-in-place, while others nearby were asked to stay inside

Nearly 20 per cent of COVID-19 infections among health-care workers by late July

WHO acknowledged the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions

Wetaskiwin RCMP make arrests for Hit and Run to residence

Damage estimates are expected to be in excess of $20,000.

Most Read