RICK BOWMER / AP

Wildlife group files complaint against B.C. conservation service for bear death

The death of a female black bear that fell from a tree after being darted with a tranquilizer has prompted a wildlife group to file a complaint with the British Columbia Conservation Officer Service.

The death of a female black bear that fell from a tree after being darted with a tranquilizer has prompted a wildlife group to file a complaint with the British Columbia Conservation Officer Service.

A spokeswoman for the animal advocacy group The Fur-Bearers says an officer from the service responded to a complaint that a bear and her three cubs were eating berries in a residential area in Whistler.

When the officer arrived, the group’s Lesley Fox says the sow was in the tree and when tranquilized the mother fell to her death.

Fox says the group wants a new policy that requires all conservation officers who use tranquilizers to also use some form of netting or protection for animals that they dart in trees.

A statement from the Ministry of Environment confirms that the bear died when it fell from the tree, adding that its officers aren’t always able to control the movement of animals while they are being sedated.

The ministry says the Conservation Officer Service makes decisions in the field based on risk to the public.

“If large carnivores have not had the opportunity to become habituated to people they may be candidates for non-lethal management, such as capture and release, if it is safe to do so,” it says.

The ministry says the province will continue to focus on preventing human-wildlife conflicts by reducing bear attractants, through public education and community involvement.

Fox says it is irresponsible to have equipment to tranquilize or immobilize an animal but not have any safety equipment to prevent injury or death.

She says it’s unclear what happen to the sow’s three cubs.

Related: Wildlife group challenges B.C.’s interpretation of law on destroying bears

Related: Court asked to review limits on B.C. conservation officers’ power to kill wildlife

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Sylvan Lake’s Megan Cressey misses Freestyle Skiing Big Air podium

Alberta’s Jake Sandstorm captured silver in the men Freestyle Skiing Big Air contest

Sylvan Lake fiddler says performing at Canada Games an amazing experience

Brianna Lizotte performed with three drummers during a segment of the Opening Ceremonies

Child advocacy centre raising funds through Dream Home Lottery

The child advocacy centre in Red Deer uses its resources to help kids all over Central Alberta

Sylvan Lake Atom C Lakers end season on low note

The Lakers played their final home game of the season, Feb. 16.

Why do zebras have stripes? Perhaps to dazzle away flies

Researchers from University of Bristol look into why zebras have stripes

Poll: More voters believe Canada doing worse under Trudeau government

22 per cent believed the country is doing better and 27 per cent said things are the same

Ponoka host to Bayer Crop Science seed innovations trade show

The company held a trade show with seed crop science industry partners at the ag event centre

Peter Tork, Monkees’ lovable bass-guitar player, dies at 77

Tork, Micky Dolenz, David Jones and Michael Nesmith formed the made-for-television rock band

Lacombe welcomes ‘Napalm Girl’ to discuss journey from hatred to forgiveness

Latest Herr Lecture to feature Kim Phuc Phan Thi at LMC

Millennial men least likely to have a family doctor: Statistics Canada

Report found more women have primary care physicians, compared with men

Alberta to play for gold in wheelchair basketball

Action-packed first week of Canada Winter Games nearly a wrap

Boxers claim two silver medals for Alberta in wild night

Cole Brander of Edmonton fought for the gold medal against Avery Martin-Duval of Quebec

Most Read