A tale of the effect of decisions made by councils past

Once upon a time there was a town in Central Alberta located on the shores of a beautiful lake.

Dear Editor,

Once upon a time there was a town in Central Alberta located on the shores of a beautiful lake. The governing councils over the years had lost the ability to associate their responsibilities to the people that had elected them. They allowed structures to be built blocking the view of the lake and restricting access to certain shores so the people couldn’t enjoy any longer.

Taj Mah toilets were built on the lakeshore along with beautiful grounds at a great expense to what was claimed not to be taxpayer money. They had forgotten that the people that elected them pay taxes other than municipal taxes. The expense to maintain and operate them had been overlooked. The reality that the shores of the beautiful lake are barren and cold for eight months of the year was not considered.

Roads were constructed, and then speed limits reduced and obstructions put in place to calm traffic which resulted in congestion. The purpose for a road to actually move vehicles was not contemplated. On a wintery November day the parking lot and walkways adjacent the aforementioned grounds were being cleared prior to the roads and sidewalks that the people used daily. Snowmobiles and ATVs were banned from using these unplowed roadways to access the beautiful lake. Priorities had not been established to provide amenities to the people that had elected them.

Councils past built a Taj Mah town hall along with beautiful grounds to house their growth and further isolate themselves from the people that had elected them.

Taxes were raised to accommodate growth they say, yet no judgment was effected to use funds to provide essential services such as dust control, paving, street cleaning, snow removal or a sustainable water supply.

This tale is not a complete illustration of councils past remiss, only a paradigm.

Optimistically councils present and future will be restrained not to resort to similar philosophies as councils past.

Gary Blick,

Sylvan Lake

 

Just Posted

Lion’s Club fundraising through Las Vegas themed ‘flight night’

The annual fundraiser is to send locals to Camp HeHoHa

Annual Polar Dip raises more than $16,000 for local charities

Hundreds watched as 38 jumpers braved the icey waters of Sylvan Lake

Former opioid user tells his story

Innisfail’s Keira Vander Vliet gives his take on the opioid crisis

Fish for free

No license is required to ice fish on Family Day weekend

SLIDESHOW: Fun and games had at Winterfest

Many came out for the annual winter festival on Sylvan Lake, Feb. 17

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Students head to Florida capital to press for gun law change

Young protestors are joining a grassroots movement against gun violence in the wake of last week’s school shooting in Parkland, Florida

Liberals look at use-it-or-lose-it parental leave for dads

Liberals looking at creating a use-it-or-lose-it leave for fathers, Trudeau says

Fred Rogers, America’s favourite neighbour, celebrated in 2018

The golden anniversary of America’s favorite neighbor is being celebrated with a PBS special next month

Toddler breaks leg after boot sucked into escalator at Vancouver airport

A Calgary woman is reminding parents of the dangers of escalators after her toddler’s foot was stuck in one and he broke his leg

Moose creates uber Canadian Olympic moment

A Calgary man shares a truly Canadian moment on Twitter of a Moose enjoying the Olympics

Trudeau announces two-way $1 billion investment deal with India

Some of India’s biggest companies to invest more than $250 million in Canada in the coming years

’60s Scoop group educates survivors, pushes rejection of federal settlement

Federal government’s compensation proposal includes $50 million for an Indigenous Healing Foundation

Most Read