Duty of elected officials to fight for electorate

The electorate pays the way, and has the right to have their opinions fought for by the elected representatives at all levels of government.

Dear Editor,

Regarding The Beach

The Hard Way: Ignore the wishes of the electorate, have a bunch of meetings, take up a lot of time, both from the council and the administration, ask for reports, get quotes, use up a massive amount of money to move a whole bunch of sand, get in a lot of machinery, hire a bunch of people and try to “manufacture” a beach on top of the one that is already there, except it’s under water. Be prepared to keep doing this each time we have a big wind and wave session, as the sand will all disappear into the lake.

The Easy Way: Lower the lake.

Regarding Highways 11 and 781 intersection

The Hard Way: Ignore the wishes of the electorate, as did the recently defeated MLA for our riding, put in a confusing, perilous, unpopular and inconvenient intersection that negates the effects of the new Innisfail bypass, puts lives at risk due to poor sight lines caused by posts and fencing in the middle of the road, and contributes to the demise of the business community on our main street. Then build a new road, with new dangerous intersections on hills at enormous cost.

The Easy Way: Traffic Lights

Our elected officials, municipal, provincial and federal are elected to represent us in government, not the other way around. The electorate pays the way, and has the right to have their opinions fought for by the elected representatives at all levels of government.

If an issue is under the jurisdiction of a higher level of government, it is the duty of the elected representatives at lower levels to fight for the electorate, and it is the duty of the higher levels of elected representatives to not only listen, but to act on our behalf.

G. Brooke Carter,

Sylvan Lake