Small actions can have enormously beneficial impacts in asset building

The following article was submitted as part of a yearlong campaign organized by the Vision for Non-Violence Sylvan Lake Chapter

Submitted

The following article was submitted as part of a yearlong campaign organized by the Vision for Non-Violence Sylvan Lake Chapter and Building Bridges sub-committee to raise awareness of the family violence and bullying that takes place in Sylvan Lake and area, and the resources available to help cope with them.

Development assets are 40 opportunities, skills, relationships, values and self-perceptions that all young people need to lead successful lives and to avoid engaging in risk-taking behaviours.

Developmental asset framework was created by the Search Institute, a non-profit, non-sectarian organization whose mission is to provide leadership, knowledge, and resources to promote healthy children, youth and communities. The framework is a research-based tool that encourages all individuals to make a difference.

The 40 Developmental Assets are broken into eight categories: Support, Empowerment, Boundaries and Expectations, Constructive Use of Time, Commitment to Learning, Positive Values, Social Competencies and Positive Identity.

Supporting environments where assets can be built is one of the most important things we do in the healthy development of young people. Here are a few principles that will help guide us in our efforts:

● Everyone can build assets: Building assets isn’t just about great families or schools or neighbourhoods. It requires consistent messages across a community.

● All young people need assets: While it is crucial to pay special attention to youth who struggle – economically, emotionally or otherwise – nearly all young people need more assets than they have.

● Relationships are key: Strong relationships between adults and young people, young people and their peers, and teenagers and children are central to asset building.

● Asset building is an ongoing process: Building assets starts when a child is born and continues throughout high school and beyond.

● Consistent messages are important: It is important for families, schools, communities, the media and others to give all young people consistent and similar messages about what is important and what is expected of them.

● Intentional repetition is important: Assets must be continually reinforced across the years and in all areas of a young person’s life.

Building assets is uncomplicated and does not cost money. Making sure your child knows their neighbours, showing a young person that his or her opinions are valued by regularly asking for input and knowing what your child is doing in school are all small actions, but their impacts are enormously beneficial. It’s simple – the more assets youth possess and experience, the more likely they are to succeed.

The Sylvan Lake SPARC committee is dedicated to engaging all community members in building assets in our children and youth. To find out more information on the small things you can do every day to build developmental assets in our children and youth, or to find out more about SPARC, contact Krista at 403-887-1137 or visit www.sylvanlake.ca/fcss/youth/bully.

 

Just Posted

Shadow Riders put service before self to action

Another season has started for the Shadow Riders 4-H Club.

Sylvan Lake Pirates force Whitecourt Wild to walk the plank

The Pirates have played their way to back-to-back wins to sit seventh in regular season standings.

Sylvan Lake students prepare for opening night of ‘Almost, Maine”

Students and staff from H.J. Cody have been hard at work since September to bring Almost to life

WATCH: Sylvan Lake’s Daddy/Daughter Dance

The event was put on by SPARC Parent’s Association on Nov. 17

West Central Midget Tigers pounce on Airdrie

The Tigers’ regular season record is 10-1-2 after two wins this weekend

VIDEO: E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce sickens 18 people in Ontario, Quebec

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says it’s working with U.S. authorities to determine the source of the romaine lettuce those who got ill were exposed to.

Feds give formal notice for law to end Canada Post strike

Trudeau government ready to legislate employees back to work after five weeks of rotating strikes

‘Bait and switch’ warning ahead of Black Friday and Cyber Monday

Competition Bureau of Canada is warning shoppers of illegal sale tactics

$90,000 pen from space created by B.C man

The Space pen is made from a meteorite

B.C. woman fined $2,300 for clocking 215 km/hr

It’s the highest fine Alberta police have issued

South Korean named Interpol president in blow to Russia

South Korea’s Kim Jong Yang was elected as Interpol’s president edging out a longtime veteran of Russia’s security services.

Trump defies calls to punish crown prince for writer’s death

The U.S. earlier sanctioned 17 Saudi officials suspected of being responsible for or complicit in the Oct. 2 killing, but members of Congress have called for harsher actions, including cancelling arms sales.

British, EU leaders to meet as Brexit deadline looms

The U.K. and the European Union agreed last week on a 585-page document sealing the terms of Britain’s departure.

Richard Oland was killed ‘in a rage,’ prosecutor tells son’s murder trial

The verdict from Oland’s 2015 murder trial was set aside on appeal in 2016. Richard Oland, 69, was found dead in his Saint John office on July 7, 2011.

Most Read