McIlroy lobbies for more consolidation in wake of shutdown

McIlroy lobbies for more consolidation in wake of shutdown

FORT WORTH, Texas — As much as golf has taken a financial hit worldwide from the COVID-19 pandemic, Rory McIlroy says it has illustrated how tours should consider some form of consolidation.

“I don’t know if everything being under one umbrella is the solution, but definitely fewer umbrellas I think is a way forward,” McIlroy said.

The world’s No. 1 player likes the idea of a world tour. He did not like the idea of an outside organization, like the Premier Golf League, trying to cherry-pick a small number of top players for events around the world. He was the first player to state publicly he would not be joining.

McIlroy said the puzzle of restoring golf schedules during the pandemic made it clear how many moving parts are involved. The first step was PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan meeting with the majors’ organizations — Augusta National, the PGA of America, USGA and R&A — to figure out when they could be played.

There are six major tours involved in the Official World Golf Ranking — PGA Tour, European Tour, Asian Tour, Japan Golf Tour, PGA Tour of Australasia and the Sunshine Tour in South Africa. Then there are 17 smaller tours (some attached to main tours) that get ranking points.

McIlroy had an idea, just not a solution.

“Whether it’s European Tour events offering FedEx Cup points and some PGA Tour events offering Race to Dubai points, I don’t know,” he said. “But just a little bit more cohesion, and then I think trying to figure out the schedule going forward this year.”

“The major bodies, they’re thinking about one or two weeks a year,” he said. “And I think speaking to the PGA Tour, speaking to the European Tour, having everyone together and trying to figure this out has definitely opened some people’s eyes to what actually goes on and how many moving parts there is. So I think the more that all these bodies can sort of work together for the greater good of game can only be a good thing.”

FINAU EXPERIENCE

Tony Finau weighed in with his own experience with racism with an Instagram post in which he detailed a 2014 incident with police.

“Have I dealt with racism in my life as a person of colour in this country? Yes, I have. I’m not proud to say,” Finau said in a video. “I’m not proud to say that I have been disrespected and mistreated because of the colour of my skin.”

Finau is of Tongan and Samoan descent whose father kept him and his brother out of trouble growing up in Utah by introducing them to golf.

Finau mentioned the police incident in which he was in a car with a white friend who had a warrant for his arrest because of “tickets with his drive.” He said police asked both of them to get out of the car, and Finau asked why.

When he got out of the car, he says police slammed him against he door and handcuffed him.

“Shortly after that, I was in the back of car,” he said. “To try to describe the feeling of injustice, unfairness at this time, and try to portray that to those who have never been treated this way, it’s a very inhumane feeling and wrong on all levels. And it’s a criminal act for law enforcement to treat anyone this way but especially those of colour.”

He said he was compelled to share his story after watching video of George Floyd, a black man who was handcuffed when a white Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee to the back of his neck until he stopped breathing.

“I voice my opinion because I stand with those who are for justice, those who are for equality and that are against police brutality and anyone abusing their authority because of the colour of someone else’s skin,” he said. “I’m against racism, and I’m for Black Lives Matter and this movement.”

MEMORIAL PLANS

Any cheering at the Memorial might sound different from mask-wearing fans.

The Memorial on July 16-19 is scheduled to be the first PGA Tour event with spectators, and the tournament hosted by Jack Nicklaus is starting to develop plans.

Tournament badges are sold out because only a limited number will be allowed. The Columbus Dispatch said it would be 8,000 fans.

Spectators will park their own cars — no more shuttles — and have their temperature taken upon arrival, along with a CDC health questionnaire. Anyone with a temperature 100 degrees or higher will be asked to stay at home.

Masks will be required, with some exceptions.

Each hole will have one-way corridors to avoid a confluence, and there will be designated sitting or standing corals on each hole with a set number of people allowed. Muirfield Village will not have grandstands.

For concessions, all sales will be with a credit card. The tournament said maximum capacity would be 20%. That includes spectators, private venues and those working the event.

Doug Ferguson, The Associated Press

Golf

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, confirmed eight additional virus-deaths Monday afternoon including one in central zone. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Central zone up to 1,249 active COVID-19 cases

Red Deer sits at 257 active COVID-19 cases

Agriculture Minister Devin Dreeshen (Alberta government photo)
Innisfail-Sylvan Lake to receive $5,000,000 in Municipal Operating Support Transfer funding

MLA Devin Dreeshen breaks down the funding communities will receive from MOST

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, confirmed eight additional virus-deaths Monday afternoon including one in central zone. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
New record: Red Deer at 236 active COVID cases

One more death in central zone reported

(Photo Courtesy of Fortis Alberta)
New FortisAlberta instillation in Sylvan means more reliability and shorter power interruption times

FortisAlberta recently installed a Distribution Automation system in Sylvan Lake

Sylvan Lake RCMP Detachment. Photo Courtesy of Google Maps
Sylvan Lake RCMP address three key areas of resident concern

RCMP were notified of these main areas of concern through an online Town Hall

Idyllic winter scenes are part of the atmosphere of the holiday season, and are depicted in many seasonal movies. How much do you know about holiday movies? Put your knowledge to the test. (Pixabay.com)
QUIZ: Test your knowledge of holiday movies and television specials

The festive season is a time for relaxing and enjoying some seasonal favourites

Ash and Lisa Van carry a freshly cut Christmas tree while wearing personal protective masks at a Christmas Tree Farm in Egbert, Ontario, Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020 THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Cole Burston
‘Everyone wants a tree and they want it now’: Christmas tree sales on pace for record

Anticipated demand for Christmas trees has sparked a rush by some to purchase more trees wholesale

A scene from last year’s Light the Night fundraiser at the Stettler Town and Country Museum. This year’s rendition is on a drive-through basis only, but it still promises to be a not-to-be-missed seasonal highlight. (Independent file photo)
Stettler Town and Country Museum hosts ‘Light the Night’

This year’s rendition is drive-through only, but will still prove to be a dazzling display

(Black Press File Photo)
Rimbey woman gathering Christmas gifts for seniors at Valleyview Manor

Margaret Tanasiuk says she doesn’t want anyone to feel forgotten on Christmas morning

Paramedics register patients at a drive through, pop-up COVID-19 test centre outside the Canadian Tire Centre, home of the NHL’s Ottawa Senators, in Ottawa, Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020. A new poll suggests most Canadians aren’t currently worried that people in other countries might get a COVID-19 vaccine first. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Canadians not worried other countries will get COVID-19 vaccine first: poll

Forty-one per cent of respondents say they want the vaccine to be mandatory for all Canadians

Fossil finds at Mt. Stephen. (Photo: Sarah Fuller/Parks Canada)
Extreme hiking, time travel and science converge in the Burgess Shale

Climb high in the alpine and trace your family tree back millions of years – to our ocean ancestors

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Executive Director and Co-Founder of Rock Soup Craig Haavalsen is sleeping in a tent outside Rock Soup’s location until the Go Fund Me for Rock Soup raises $10,000. Shaela Dansereau/ Pipestone Flyer.
Putting normalcy into asking for help: New non-profit sets up in Wetaskiwin

Rock Soup non-profit is a new secular Food Bank putting down roots in Wetaskiwin.

Most Read