FILE - In this June 29, 2019, file photo, Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Skaggs throws to the Oakland Athletics during a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif. Skaggs died from a toxic mix of the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone along with alcohol in an accidental overdose, a medical examiner in Texas ruled in a report released Friday, Aug. 30, 2019. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

MLB, players’ union report positive talks on opioids testing

Talks follow the death of Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs

Major League Baseball and its players’ union are optimistic talks are progressing on testing for opioids following the death of Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs.

“The dialogue in this has been really positive with the players association, a lot of common ground on addressing the issue,” Commissioner Rob Manfred said Wednesday before Game 2 of the World Series. “We understand that our workforce is a microcosm of society. There’s a societal problem.”

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room on July 1 before the start of a series against the Texas Rangers. The Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office said the 27-year-old died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his body.

ALSO READ: Drug users urged to get naloxone kits after research shows many in B.C. don’t have one

While the joint program of MLB and the players’ association has testing with penalties for performance-enhancing drugs and banned stimulants, opioids are included in drugs of abuse and not subject to testing with penalties for players on 40-man rosters.

Players with minor league contracts are subject to testing for opioids with discipline.

“Tyler hit home for a number of guys that knew him and a number of guys that didn’t,” union head Tony Clark said. “Whether the players know of another player, they may know somebody in the family that’s struggling with it. So it still hits close to home.”

The joint drug agreement has a provision calling for annual updating.

Ronald Blum, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Sylvan Lake Lions Club celebrates 65 years of community service

The club was founded in October 1954 and celebrated its 65th anniversary on Nov. 16, 2019

Yuletide Festival, Light Up The Lake to kick off holiday season in Sylvan Lake

Sylvan Lake will have a jolly time Nov. 29-30 to celebrate the start of the holiday season

PHOTOS: Bull riding finals take over Sylvan Lake

The finals champion and the national champion were named in Sylvan Lake, Nov. 16

Sylvan Lake students visit with Speaker of the Legislative Assembly

Speaker Nathan Cooper visited Steffie Woima Nov. 14 as part of his outreach program

WATCH: Washboard Union opens bull riding weekend in Sylvan Lake

Country artists Jason Benoit and Washboard Union played to a full audience Nov. 14

Cold, stormy winter forecast across much of Canada, The Weather Network predicts

In British Columbia temperatures will be slightly above normal and precipitation will be just below normal

‘Midget’ no more: Sweeping division name changes coming to minor hockey in Canada

Alpha-numeric division names will be used for the 2020-2021 season and beyond

Ottawa urges CN and union to continue talks as 3,200 workers go on strike

The rail workers began their strike after failing to reach a deal by a midnight deadline

University of Calgary to slash payroll after post-secondary funding cuts

The government is also cutting all funding for the Infrastructure Maintenance Program

Trans Mountain received $320M in government subsidies in first half 2019: report

The money included $135.8 million in direct subsidies and $183.8 million in indirect subsidies

Canadian universities encourage exchange students in Hong Kong to head home

UBC said 11 of its 32 students completing programs in Hong Kong have already left

15 charged following protests at two Alberta kennels that provide sled dog tours

RCMP say they were called to the Mad Dogs and Englishmen kennels east of Canmore

Protesters say Alberta bill would make it harder to access some medical services

The bill would mean a health-care provider could not be sanctioned for refusing to provide a service due to morals

Most Read