Environment

The Giant Mine site is shown during a site surface tour of the Giant Mine Remediation Project near Yellowknife on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2022. With a newly approved cost estimate of $4.38 billion, remediation of Giant Mine, one of the most contaminated sites in Canada, is also expected to be the most expensive federal environmental cleanup. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Angela Gzowski

Canada’s top 5 federal contaminated sites to cost taxpayers billions to clean up

Sites include B.C.’s Esquimalt Harbour, where hundreds of millions are expected to be spent in total

 

An adult Piping Plover runs along a beach as waves lap on the shore in the background, in the Quonochontaug Conservation Area, in Westerly, R.I., July 12, 2007. An environmental law group is taking the federal government to court over new rules to protect piping plover habitat. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Steven Senne

Environmental group takes federal government to court over piping plover habitat

Group claims feds’ amended version of protection strategy leaves birds more vulnerable

 

A solar farm is pictured in Wasserleben near Wernigerode at the ‘Harz’ mountains, Germany, Thursday, July 21, 2022. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

VIDEO: Climate questions: What are the solutions?

Hundreds of potential solutions being explored

A solar farm is pictured in Wasserleben near Wernigerode at the ‘Harz’ mountains, Germany, Thursday, July 21, 2022. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)
A group from Parks Canada and First Nations along with others gather in a circle to discuss the clam bed restoration project underway while on the Salish sea garden tour on Russell Island, a 32-acre Gulf Island National Park near Salt Spring Island, B.C., Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

VIDEO: Restoring the culinary and cultural bounty of ancient Indigenous sea gardens in B.C.

Indigenous leaders are looking to gain approval for clam harvesting using their sea garden method

A group from Parks Canada and First Nations along with others gather in a circle to discuss the clam bed restoration project underway while on the Salish sea garden tour on Russell Island, a 32-acre Gulf Island National Park near Salt Spring Island, B.C., Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Here’s what to know about Alberta’s updated planting guidelines

Non-native plants can quickly become a threat to the ecological integrity in Jasper National park

FILE - Climate activists Elizabeth Wathuti of Kenia, Vanessa Nakate of Uganda and Helena Gualinga of Ecuador attend the climate protest alongside the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 26, 2022. A group of top climate scientists say the world needs to think about the ultimate climate catastrophe, human extinction, and how possible it is. They are calling on the world’s main climate science body to look at the ultimate climate catastrophes, no matter how remotely unlikely they are. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)

Chances of climate catastrophe are ignored, scientists say

“I do not believe civilization as we know it will make it out of this century”: B.C. scientist

FILE - Climate activists Elizabeth Wathuti of Kenia, Vanessa Nakate of Uganda and Helena Gualinga of Ecuador attend the climate protest alongside the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 26, 2022. A group of top climate scientists say the world needs to think about the ultimate climate catastrophe, human extinction, and how possible it is. They are calling on the world’s main climate science body to look at the ultimate climate catastrophes, no matter how remotely unlikely they are. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)
As plastic continues to pollute the ocean, Oceana Canada is calling on the government action (credit Oceana Canada/Elemental).

Plastic predicament: Federal group urges action on packaging legislation in Canada

Oceana Canada is calling on the government to reduce the amount of harmful single-use plastics

As plastic continues to pollute the ocean, Oceana Canada is calling on the government action (credit Oceana Canada/Elemental).
FILE - Wildfires burning hundreds of miles away create smoky conditions Monday, June 13, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska’s remarkable wildfire season includes over 530 blazes that have burned an area more than three times the size of Rhode Island, with nearly all the impacts, including dangerous breathing conditions from smoke, attributed to fires started by lightning. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

Alaska experiencing wildfires it’s never seen before

530 wildfires already recorded this year, worst of season yet to come

FILE - Wildfires burning hundreds of miles away create smoky conditions Monday, June 13, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska’s remarkable wildfire season includes over 530 blazes that have burned an area more than three times the size of Rhode Island, with nearly all the impacts, including dangerous breathing conditions from smoke, attributed to fires started by lightning. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)
A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Landfills and climate change increasing polar bear-human conflicts in Arctic: report

Climate change diminishing food supply for bears, while making the Arctic more hospitable for humans

A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream of the Koocanusa Reservoir, near the Montana-Idaho boundary and Leonia, Idaho, on Sept. 19, 2014. The agency that mediates disputes between Canada and the U.S. over shared waters is pleading with the federal Liberals to join an investigation into contamination from British Columbia coal mines.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP - The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers

International commission asks Canada to join probe of selenium flowing from B.C.

Ottawa has already rejected a similar request from the Ktunaxa First Nation

A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream of the Koocanusa Reservoir, near the Montana-Idaho boundary and Leonia, Idaho, on Sept. 19, 2014. The agency that mediates disputes between Canada and the U.S. over shared waters is pleading with the federal Liberals to join an investigation into contamination from British Columbia coal mines.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP - The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers
A sign opposing coal development in the eastern slopes of the Livingston range south west of Longview, Alta., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Alberta town endorses community-developed policy saying no to coal mining in Rockies

High River has joined 30 organizations in signing a document pushing prohibition of coal in Alberta

A sign opposing coal development in the eastern slopes of the Livingston range south west of Longview, Alta., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Coral reefs provide stunning images of a world under assault

Coral Morphologic shows real-world example of how coral communities can adapt at busy port of Miami

Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP

North America’s love affair with the lawn is getting messy

Some homeowners seeing a well-manicured lawn as an anachronism, even a threat

This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP
Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Proposed cattle feedlot threatens popular but fragile Alberta lake, residents say

G&S Cattle of Ponoka, Alta., wants to pen 4,000 cattle about four kilometres west of Pigeon Lake

Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Feds enshrining right to healthy environment but no clarity on what that means

Government will have up to two years after bill takes effect to define that right’s implementation

A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
This submitted photo shows Paul Cottrell, wearing the red jacket, helping to disentangle a humpback whale.

A first as the world warms: New forecasts could help predict marine heat waves

Multiple marine heat waves have occurred since 2014 along the Washington coast

This submitted photo shows Paul Cottrell, wearing the red jacket, helping to disentangle a humpback whale.
A group of Canada geese stand on railway tracks as a plant operates in the background at Hamilton Harbour in Hamilton, Ont. Tuesday December 10, 2002. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer

Biggest emitters paying smallest price on pollution, critics say

Big companies with higher emissions pay the carbon price only on what they emit above a set limit

A group of Canada geese stand on railway tracks as a plant operates in the background at Hamilton Harbour in Hamilton, Ont. Tuesday December 10, 2002. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer
The Yukon provincial flag flies on a flag pole in Ottawa, Monday July 6, 2020. Yukon’s snow survey shows record high snowpacks in many of the basins the territory monitors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Yukon’s record snowpack adds potential for flooding during ice breakup

April survey usually represents the peak snow levels in most of the territory

The Yukon provincial flag flies on a flag pole in Ottawa, Monday July 6, 2020. Yukon’s snow survey shows record high snowpacks in many of the basins the territory monitors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
A couple are dwarfed by old growth tress as they walk in Avatar Grove near Port Renfrew, B.C.,Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. An environmental organization is offering cautious support for an announcement that the largest private landowner in British Columbia will defer 400 square kilometres of old-growth stands from logging for the next 25 years. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Environmental group gives guarded support for company’s old-growth forest plan

Mosaic, B.C.’s largest private landowner, will defer logging in 400 square kilometres of old-growth

A couple are dwarfed by old growth tress as they walk in Avatar Grove near Port Renfrew, B.C.,Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. An environmental organization is offering cautious support for an announcement that the largest private landowner in British Columbia will defer 400 square kilometres of old-growth stands from logging for the next 25 years. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward