Indigenous

Darin Keewatin is pictured in Edmonton on Tuesday January 4, 2022. Keewatin is concerned about slow movement on federal legislation allowing Indigenous groups to take control of child welfare. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

First Nation says Alberta is preventing it from taking control of child welfare

Louis Bull Tribe asked to enter an agreement with Alberta and Canada in October 2020

 

Fans sitting in a section behind the field goals during an NFL football game between Philadelphia Eagles and Washington Football Team, Sunday, Jan. 2, 2022, in Landover, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Washington football team to reveal new name on Feb. 2; won’t be RedWolves

‘We are on the brink of starting a new chapter, but our legacy cannot be lost along the way’

 

The Peace Tower is hit with late afternoon light on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020. An agreement in principle that will see Ottawa pay billions in compensation to First Nations children harmed by an underfunded child welfare system is set to be announced in Ottawa today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Ottawa announces details of $40 billion Indigenous child-welfare settlement

$20 billion will pay for compensation, $20 billion will be spent on reforming the system

 

The Peace Tower is hit with late afternoon light on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020. An agreement in principle that will see Ottawa pay billions in compensation to First Nations children harmed by an underfunded child welfare system is set to be announced in Ottawa today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
The Peace Tower is hit with late afternoon light on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020. An agreement in principle that will see Ottawa pay billions in compensation to First Nations children harmed by an underfunded child welfare system is set to be announced in Ottawa today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller participates in a news conference regarding the order from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal to compensate Indigenous children and their families, in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Feds, Indigenous leaders to announce child welfare compensation agreement Tuesday

Indigenous youth account for more than half the children under 15 in foster care

Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller participates in a news conference regarding the order from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal to compensate Indigenous children and their families, in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
A child’s dress is seen on a cross outside a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C., Sunday, June 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Finding unmarked graves put spotlight on reconciliation in 2021

‘It’s important to remind Canadians (not to) let reconciliation become a performance’

A child’s dress is seen on a cross outside a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C., Sunday, June 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Brigette Lacquette poses for a photo at the IIHF World Junior Hockey Championship in Edmonton on Tuesday, December 28, 2021. Lacquette is the first Indigenous woman to scout for an NHL team. She works for the Chicago Blackhawks. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Brigette Lacquette poses for a photo at the IIHF World Junior Hockey Championship in Edmonton on Tuesday, December 28, 2021. Lacquette is the first Indigenous woman to scout for an NHL team. She works for the Chicago Blackhawks. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Candy Palmater. (The Social)

Indigenous comedian and host of ‘The Candy Show,’ Candy Palmater dead at 53

Palmater had been sick for years, although the exact cause of her death is unknown

Candy Palmater. (The Social)
Clarence Iron, shown in a handout photo, always dreamt of being part of “Hockey Night in Canada,” but not even in his dreams did he envision calling games in his own language. Now the 60-year-old broadcaster from the Canoe Lake Cree Nation is set bring the sport he loves to his community in a whole new way with the debut of “Hockey Night in Canada in Cree.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-APTN
Clarence Iron, shown in a handout photo, always dreamt of being part of “Hockey Night in Canada,” but not even in his dreams did he envision calling games in his own language. Now the 60-year-old broadcaster from the Canoe Lake Cree Nation is set bring the sport he loves to his community in a whole new way with the debut of “Hockey Night in Canada in Cree.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-APTN

Canadian broadcaster hopes hockey call will help save his Cree language

‘Hockey Night in Canada in Cree’ will feature NHL games broadcast in Indigenous language

Clarence Iron, shown in a handout photo, always dreamt of being part of “Hockey Night in Canada,” but not even in his dreams did he envision calling games in his own language. Now the 60-year-old broadcaster from the Canoe Lake Cree Nation is set bring the sport he loves to his community in a whole new way with the debut of “Hockey Night in Canada in Cree.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-APTN
Clarence Iron, shown in a handout photo, always dreamt of being part of “Hockey Night in Canada,” but not even in his dreams did he envision calling games in his own language. Now the 60-year-old broadcaster from the Canoe Lake Cree Nation is set bring the sport he loves to his community in a whole new way with the debut of “Hockey Night in Canada in Cree.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-APTN
Jane Kigutaq, a kindergarten teacher from Arctic Bay now living in Ottawa, protests on Parliament Hill at a “Cancel Canada Day” event in response to the discovery of unmarked indigenous graves at residential schools on July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Patrick Doyle

Children who never returned from residential schools newsmaker of the year: CP poll

They were honoured with thousands of tiny shoes lined up in front…

Jane Kigutaq, a kindergarten teacher from Arctic Bay now living in Ottawa, protests on Parliament Hill at a “Cancel Canada Day” event in response to the discovery of unmarked indigenous graves at residential schools on July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Patrick Doyle
A child’s dress hung on a cross blows in the wind near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the facility in Kamloops, B.C., on Friday, June 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Discovery of unmarked graves selected as Canada’s news story of the year: CP poll

Discovery in Kamloops served as a chilling, consciousness-raising event for Canadians

A child’s dress hung on a cross blows in the wind near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the facility in Kamloops, B.C., on Friday, June 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
The Peace tower is seen on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Ottawa to include $40B in fiscal update to cover compensation for First Nations kids

The spending is contingent on Ottawa and child-welfare advocates reaching an agreement

The Peace tower is seen on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald speaks during a news conference in Kamloops, BC., on Thursday, September 30, 2021. Archibald says an upcoming delegation to the Vatican has been postponed.	 THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Indigenous papal visit postponed to 2022 amid concerns around Omicron COVID-19 variant

Group postponed because of ‘uncertainty and potential health risks surrounding international travel’

Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald speaks during a news conference in Kamloops, BC., on Thursday, September 30, 2021. Archibald says an upcoming delegation to the Vatican has been postponed.	 THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
`Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller responds to questions during a news conference in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. Canada’s Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister says the federal government will soon release some of the residential school records it’s been criticized for withholding to a national archives centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Federal government will soon hand over more residential school records: Miller

The minister says the reports will be provided to the centre within 30 days

`Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller responds to questions during a news conference in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. Canada’s Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister says the federal government will soon release some of the residential school records it’s been criticized for withholding to a national archives centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller responds to questions during a news conference in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. Canada’s Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister says the federal government will soon release some of the residential school records it’s been criticized for withholding to a national archives centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

No evidence Liberals knew appeal over residential school payments was dropped: Miller

Miller says there’s no evidence Wilson-Raybould or anyone in cabinet was made aware of the decision

Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller responds to questions during a news conference in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. Canada’s Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister says the federal government will soon release some of the residential school records it’s been criticized for withholding to a national archives centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Phil Fontaine poses for a portrait in Toronto on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021. A former Assembly of First Nations national chief, Fontaine is hopeful as he prepares to make a second trip to the Vatican to ask a pope to apologize for the Catholic Church’s role in residential schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tijana Martin

Former national chief remains hopeful before second trip to Vatican

150,000 Indigenous children were forced to attend residential schools, largely run by the Catholic Church

Phil Fontaine poses for a portrait in Toronto on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021. A former Assembly of First Nations national chief, Fontaine is hopeful as he prepares to make a second trip to the Vatican to ask a pope to apologize for the Catholic Church’s role in residential schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tijana Martin
Pope Francis blesses faithful as he starts his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Andrew Medichini

Assembly of First Nations announces 13 delegates to meet Pope Francis at the Vatican

Delegates representing First Nations from across Canada going to the Vatican from Dec. 14 to 21

Pope Francis blesses faithful as he starts his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Andrew Medichini
Indigenous families are grossly overrepresented in birth alerts in B.C. File photo of reporter Anna McKenzie and her daughter taken by Captured Memories Photography. Bayleigh Marelj, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Indigenous lawsuit seeks damages from B.C. for disproportionate birth alerts

Suit alleges alerts motivated by discriminatory and harmful stereotypes about parenting capabilities

Indigenous families are grossly overrepresented in birth alerts in B.C. File photo of reporter Anna McKenzie and her daughter taken by Captured Memories Photography. Bayleigh Marelj, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter
Pope Francis salutes bishops as he arrives for his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Alessandra Tarantino

Indigenous delegates to have private meeting with Pope Francis during Vatican visit

Pontiff will hear personal stories of the legacy of residential schools

Pope Francis salutes bishops as he arrives for his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Alessandra Tarantino
The Indian River estuary, which connects the ocean inlet around North Vancouver, B.C., to the freshwater river, is shown in this undated aerial photo. A new study on salmon bones dating back thousands of years shows the Tsleil-Waututh Indigenous nation around North Vancouver targeted male salmon for their meat and to sustain the fishery. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Tsleil-Waututh Nation

B.C. study shows sustainable management of salmon fishery before colonization

Archeological evidence shows First Nations effort to focus harvest on males led to stable fishery

The Indian River estuary, which connects the ocean inlet around North Vancouver, B.C., to the freshwater river, is shown in this undated aerial photo. A new study on salmon bones dating back thousands of years shows the Tsleil-Waututh Indigenous nation around North Vancouver targeted male salmon for their meat and to sustain the fishery. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Tsleil-Waututh Nation