New glow-in-the-dark coin depicts 1967 Canadian UFO encounter

Royal Canadian Mint depicts incident in Shag Harbour, Nova Scotia

A new coin released by the Royal Canadian Mint depicts a famous UFO encounter in Shag Harbour, Nova Scotia in 1967. The coin has a special glow-in-the-dark feature that shows two different perspectives.

Canada’s best-documented UFO crash is the subject of a new glow-in-the-dark coin released by the Royal Canadian Mint.

According to the mint’s website, the rectangular silver coin is a re-telling of a UFO crash that prompted a government investigation in 1967 in the small fishing village of Shag Harbour, Nova Scotia.

On Oct. 4 of that year, witnesses spotted a craft about 60 feet in diameter crash into the sea. The flash of light led them to believe a plane had crashed.

Three RCMP officers, including one who had also seen the lights, arrived at the impact site and saw a strange object glowing in the water less then a kilometre from shore.

But officials soon discovered that no aircraft were reported missing, and, by the time Coast Guard and military vessels arrived, the lights had vanished and only sparking yellow foam remained on the surface.

The search for a downed craft continued, but no debris was found, and the investigation was called off on Oct. 9.

Government documents showed that authorities could not offer a conventional explanation, and the Shag Harbour incident today remains a mystery.

The Royal Canadian Mint coin depicts a view of the UFO encounter from a witness’ perspective from a fishing boat.

It comes with a black-light flashlight to activate its glow-in-the-dark features.

The coin, which has a face value of $20, sells for $129.95, and 95 per cent of the 4,000 coins available were sold as of Tuesday.

This is the second UFO coin produced by the mint. The previous one – sold in 2018 – depicted a UFO encounter in Falcon Lake, Manitoba, in May 1967.

RELATED: B.C. artist designs coin for Royal Canadian Mint

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